Welcome

Enlisting Faith – How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America


By Ronit Y. Stahl ’02. Harvard University Press, November 2017. Beginning at the outbreak of World War I, this book follows the development of religious pluralism in the military chaplaincy throughout the 20th century. The chaplaincy began with just Protestant and Catholic chaplains, and, through struggle and debate, expanded to include Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Seventh … Continue reading “Enlisting Faith – How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America”


Bernie Kosar – Learning to Scramble


By Bernie Kosar with Craig Stout ’70. Cleveland Landmarks Press, September 2017. With the help of Craig Stout, Bernie Kosar relates how he overcame a variety of challenges both during and after his college and professional football career.


Kiss Me Someone


By Karen Shepard ’87, Senior Lecturer in English. Tin House Books, September 2017. Available on Amazon. Kiss Me Someone is inhabited by women who walk the line between various states: adolescence and adulthood, stability and uncertainty, selfishness and compassion. They navigate the obstacles that come with mixed-race identity and instabilities in social class, and they use … Continue reading “Kiss Me Someone”


The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole


By Michelle Cuevas ’04. Dial Books, September 2017. Available on Amazon. When eleven-year-old Stella Rodriguez shows up at NASA to request that her recording be included in Carl Sagan’s Golden Record, something unexpected happens: A black hole follows her home, and sets out to live in her house as a pet. The black hole swallows … Continue reading “The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole”


Smoot: A Rebellious Shadow


By Michelle Cuevas ’04. Dial Books, September 2017. Available on Amazon. Smoot the shadow has been living a yawn-filled life for years. His boy never laughs and never leaps, so Smoot never does either… until the day he pops free, and decides to hit the road in search of the life he dreams about. And … Continue reading “Smoot: A Rebellious Shadow”


Time For a Heart to Heart: Reflections on Life in the Face of Death


By Bob Mitchell ’66. Skyhorse Publishing, January 2018. Available on Amazon. Time for a Heart-to-Heart is eclectic in tone—at times philosophical, poetic, poignant, uplifting, confessional, hysterically funny, and nostalgic. But most of all, it is an inspiring story of the triumph of hope and the human spirit in the face of the direst of circumstances … Continue reading “Time For a Heart to Heart: Reflections on Life in the Face of Death”


The Keep of Ages: Book Three of the Vault of Dreamers Trilogy


By Caragh O’Brien ’84. Roaring Brook Press, August 2017. Available on Amazon. Driven by fear when Dean Berg kidnaps her family, Rosie Sinclair strikes out across the country to rescue them. When an elusive trail leads her to Grisly Valley, the contaminated ruin of a horror theme park, Rosie has to consider that Berg may … Continue reading “The Keep of Ages: Book Three of the Vault of Dreamers Trilogy”


Realizing the Distinctive University: Vision and Values, Strategy and Culture


By Mark Roche ’78. University of Notre Dame Press, 2017. Available on Amazon. In Realizing the Distinctive University: Vision and Values, Strategy and Culture, Mark Roche changes the terms of the debate about American higher education. A former dean of the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame, Roche argues for … Continue reading “Realizing the Distinctive University: Vision and Values, Strategy and Culture”


On Faith and Science


By Edward Larson ’74 and Michael Ruse. Yale University Press, 2017. Available on Amazon. Throughout history, scientific discovery has clashed with religious dogma, creating conflict, controversy, and sometimes violent dispute. In this enlightening and accessible volume, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prize–winning author Edward Larson and Michael Ruse, philosopher of science and Gifford Lecturer, offer their distinctive … Continue reading “On Faith and Science”


Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States


By James C. Scott ’58. Yale University Press, August 2017. Available on Amazon. Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and … Continue reading “Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States”