Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations


By Allison Varzally. The University of North Carolina Press, February 2017. Available on Amazon. As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many … Continue reading “Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations”


Newsworthy


By Samantha Barbas ’94. Stanford Law Books. Available on Amazon. This is a story of how American law and culture struggled to define and reconcile the right of privacy and the rights of the press at a critical point in history—when the news media were at the peak of their authority and when cultural and political … Continue reading “Newsworthy”


Assassins


by Mike Bond ’65. Mandevilla Press, December 2016. Available on Amazon. Multiple thrillers and love stories, a dissection of our present geopolitical tragedies and a meditation on the deepest duties of a military man toward those he commands, those he loves, and the nation he serves, it’s all there in Assassins.


The Architecture of Percier and Fontaine and the Struggle for Sovereignty in Revolutionary France


By Iris Moon ’02. Routledge, December 2016. Available on Amazon. As the official architects of Napoleon, Charles Percier (1764–1838) and Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine (1762–1853) designed interiors that responded to the radical ideologies and collective forms of destruction that took place during the French Revolution. The architects visualized new forms of imperial sovereignty by inverting the symbols … Continue reading “The Architecture of Percier and Fontaine and the Struggle for Sovereignty in Revolutionary France”


Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything


By Becky Bond ’92 an Zack Exley. Chelsea Green Publishing, Nov. 2016. Available on Amazon. Rules for Revolutionaries tells the story of a breakthrough experiment conducted on the fringes of the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign: A technology-driven team empowered volunteers to build and manage the infrastructure to make seventy-five million calls, launch eight million text … Continue reading “Rules for Revolutionaries: How Big Organizing Can Change Everything”


The Scarred Double Eagle


By Donald P. Gregg ’51. Shires Press, October 2016. In the mid 1980s, Donald P. Gregg bought two U.S. silver dollars, both dated 1882, from a peddler outside the ancient Roman ruin of Jerash in Jordan, and wondered how they had gotten there, how they were spent, and in whose pockets they had traveled. Gregg’s purchase … Continue reading “The Scarred Double Eagle”


Confessions of a Born-Again Pagan


By Anthony Kronman ’68. Yale University Press, October 2016. Available on Amazon. We live in an age of disenchantment. The number of self-professed “atheists” continues to grow. Yet many still feel an intense spiritual longing for a connection to what Aristotle called the “eternal and divine.” For those who do, but demand a God that is … Continue reading “Confessions of a Born-Again Pagan”


A Thin Bright Line


By Lucy Jane Bledsoe ’77 MA. University of Wisconsin Press, 2016. Available on Amazon. At the height of the Cold War, Lucybelle Bledsoe is offered a job seemingly too good to pass up. However, there are risks. Her scientific knowledge and editorial skills are unparalleled, but her personal life might not withstand government scrutiny. Leaving … Continue reading “A Thin Bright Line”


Corresponding Lives: Mabel Dodge Luhan, A. A. Brill, and the Psychoanalytic Adventure in America


By Patricia R. Everett ’79. Karnac Books, October 2016. Available on Amazon. An influential New York salon host and perpetual seeker of meaning, Mabel Dodge entered psychoanalysis in 1916 with A.A. Brill, the first American psychoanalyst, continuing until she moved to New Mexico in December 1917. In Taos, she met Antonio Luhan, the Pueblo Indian … Continue reading “Corresponding Lives: Mabel Dodge Luhan, A. A. Brill, and the Psychoanalytic Adventure in America”


This Isn’t a Game


By David Moss ’85. Poisoned Pen Press, October 2016. Available on Amazon. Jackson Oliver, the hero of Moss’s thoroughly enjoyable first novel and series launch, owns a Costa Rica–based online betting site, VegasVegas. This winning debut offers insights into gambling odds, antiques, the raising of buffalo, the film industry, and small-town morality.