Welcome

Life Lessons from Working with Great Teachers


By Rick Ackerly ’67. Xlibris, September 2020. Borrowing from the successes of 57 educators, Ackerly relates lessons on building better schools, beyond quick fixes such as changing the curriculum and adding new programs. In a culture where children are taught to value individualism, schools are often run with a more authoritarian structure, which, the author … Continue reading “Life Lessons from Working with Great Teachers”


Fighter: Awakening the Dream of a Soccer Champion


By Erinn Torres ’97. Independently published, October 2020. In this YA novel, a 13-year-old soccer player named Stella learns what it takes to be a champion in order to achieve her dreams in a male-dominated field. The attributes of perseverance, passion, courage and more take center stage in a novel written by a former competitive athlete … Continue reading “Fighter: Awakening the Dream of a Soccer Champion”


Strict Beauty: Sol LeWitt Prints


By David S. Areford. Yale University Press, November 2020. The artist Sol LeWitt, famous for large wall drawings and structures, also created more than 350 print projects using lithographs, silkscreens, etchings, aquatints, woodcuts and linocuts. This book accompanies the exhibit Strict Beauty: Sol LeWitt Prints, guest curated by David S. Areford and co-organized by the Williams College Museum … Continue reading “Strict Beauty: Sol LeWitt Prints”


On the Universality of What Is Not: The Apophatic Turn in Critical Thinking


By William Franke ’78. University of Notre Dame, October 2020. Living in our current global society, we encounter thinking from a broad range of nations, cultures and religions, making it difficult to find commonality and raising unanswerable questions. In response to some of humanity’s most perplexing philosophical and religious conundrums, Franke presents case studies from … Continue reading “On the Universality of What Is Not: The Apophatic Turn in Critical Thinking”


The American Revolution in the Twenty-First Century


By Howard DeLong ’57. Belcrest Press, November 2020. The architects of America envisioned a post-Revolution society in which everyone would be free and prosperous. DeLong proposes that the America of today is fraught with political dysfunction but can still fulfill the founders’ vision through the use of modern technology and a new institution: a Court … Continue reading “The American Revolution in the Twenty-First Century”


Biblical Concept of Hell: The Ultimate Destination of Human Souls


By William S. Hyland ’62. Newman Springs Publishing, September 2020. From Genesis to the New Testament, various Bible verses concerning death and the afterlife have led humans to form a concept of fiery hell. Do those who reject Christ face an eternity of flames and torment? The author researches the Bible as an inspiring and … Continue reading “Biblical Concept of Hell: The Ultimate Destination of Human Souls”


The Violence Inside Us: A Brief History of an Ongoing American Tragedy


By Chris Murphy ’96. Random House, September 2020. After the 2012 mass murder at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy began a deep examination of America’s obsession with violence and its love of guns. Through personal narrative and detailed investigation of human history and American politics, Murphy lays out a … Continue reading “The Violence Inside Us: A Brief History of an Ongoing American Tragedy”


Rosie Lee Tompkins: A Retrospective


By Elaine Y. Yau, Lawrence Rinder and Horace Ballard, Williams College curator of American art. University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, 2020. The BAMPFA exhibition catalog presents the quilts and found-object art of Rosie Lee Tompkins through brilliant photos and thoughtful essays. The New York Times named the catalog one of the Best … Continue reading “Rosie Lee Tompkins: A Retrospective”


From Ignorance to Insanity (Observations of an Old Man)


By Robert D. Ohmes ’57. RDO Publications, October 2020. Throughout America’s history, civil public discourse has been essential to surviving hardships such as world wars, presidential assassinations and economic depressions. Arguing that the discourse of today lacks the cornerstones of liberty, justice, wisdom and humility, Ohmes encourages readers to create a more peaceful society by … Continue reading “From Ignorance to Insanity (Observations of an Old Man)”


A Short History of Presidential Election Crises (and how to prevent the next one)


By Alan Hirsch MA ’12, Lecturer in Humanities, Chair of Justice and Law Studies. City Lights Books, March 2020. What happens when a U.S. presidential election becomes controversial? A close election in 2000 tested the limitations of the current system, and President Trump’s refusal to accept the results of the 2020 election again pushed the … Continue reading “A Short History of Presidential Election Crises (and how to prevent the next one)”